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dbrimley avatar image
dbrimley asked ·

DSE In-Memory Deprecated in 6.8. What's the replacement?

Hi,

I've noticed there are a number of deprecated features in DSE 6.8.

  • In Memory (deprecated).
  • Multi-Instance (deprecated).
  • Tiered Storage (deprecated).

Can somebody tell me what is planned to replace the In-Memory feature?

I read in another post that Tiered Storage is being removed because of low take-up. Is that also the case with the In-Memory feature?

Thanks

David

dsetiered storagein-memorymulti-instance
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1 Answer

Erick Ramirez avatar image
Erick Ramirez answered ·

There are no plans to replace the deprecated features you mentioned, including In-Memory. It is used for edge cases and the demand for the feature has not been sufficient.

However I wanted to point out that DataStax Enterprise 5.1 has long-term support (LTS), slotted until October 2024 so these features will continue to be supported at least until that date:

  • DSE In-Memory
  • DSE Multi-Instance
  • DSE Tiered Storage

In case you ask, I don't know at this point if DSE 6.8 (or other releases) will be LTS. Cheers!

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Hi Erick,


Thanks for the answer, so I'm clear, the recommended way to get in-memory performance would be to use the Data Caching feature as described here?

https://docs.datastax.com/en/dse/6.8/dse-admin/datastax_enterprise/operations/opsDataCachingTOC.html

David.

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Strictly speaking, row cache is not the same as the In-Memory feature but in some cases it may achieve the outcome you are after.

For example, row cache is only effective for tables with read-heavy access patterns (mostly reads, hardly any writes) and where the "hot dataset" (most accessed rows) fit into the cache. Cheers!

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